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5 for Leadership-December 19th

Leadership-Christmas-NewYork

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This version of 5 for Leadership has some great topics that will inspire you and serve to equip you to lead better. The topics covered this week are leadership vision, leadership simplicity, reaching your goals, the virtue of reading through your Bible in a year, and eleven inspiring leadership quotes.

The Power of Vision

“As most leaders can attest, vision tends to “leak” in organizations. The vision is put forward for all the key constituents and everyone seems to be on board and excited. Then a few weeks, or even a few days, go by, and suddenly the demands of day-to-day life and organizational needs turn the attention of people away from vision.” See what else Justin Irving has to say about this critical leadership task.

10 Ways To Simplify Your Leadership

“Often our greatest hardships are those we impose upon ourselves. There are some who think that in order to be a great leader, we have to allow life to teach us the hard way—but in truth, if we are open to learning things can come with ease. Great leaders are almost always great simplifiers.” Lolly Daskal is always on point–take a look.

The One Quality You Must Develop to Reach Your Goals

What does it take to accomplish your goals? Some people think it’s mostly about luck, smarts, good looks, and social connections. Nope.” Michael Hyatt provides some very practical advice that could get you off to a great start in the new year.

Fruitful Vines: 7 Reasons to Read the Bible in a Year

“I spent last week cleaning up the remains of tomato vines from my garden. It’s easy work because once vines are dead, they lose all strength and break apart with little effort. While the remains of a tree can be made into a range of items from paper products to furniture, a detached vine crumbles to dust with the slightest touch. It has no use except kindle for the fire.” Melissa Kruger makes a great case for this important spiritual discipline–every leader needs to consider this.

The Art of Leadership: 11 Quotes on Leading Well

Jonathan Michael gives us eleven inspirational quotes to help us think about our leadership as we finish another year–and launch into another year of intentional influence.

There are the 5 for this week. Merry Christmas!

The Principle of Focus

medium_4106216129I returned from speaking at a conference a few days ago and had a great time interacting with old friends and new friends.  I was able to do some teaching on leadership while I was there and had a couple of opportunities for some Q & A.

I made the statement during one of my messages that “the key to complexity is not simplicity, but focus”.

I have often made that statement about leadership and stand by it.  I usually preface that statement with the idea that if you are not dealing with some level of complexity then you are not really leading anything of significance.

A question arose about what I meant by focus over simplicity.  In the heat of the moment I didn’t think I provided a very credible answer, so let me try again.

Complexity implies that the leadership setting you are in carries multiple, and even competing, possibilities.

There are many things to which you can give your leadership energy.  The tendency is to fall prey to the urgent, which as Mr. Covey reminds us does not always include the most important priorities.

To try and simply aim for simplicity is not an option.

What is simplicity at that point?

It usually means to give your energy to that which is in the present tense and the most easily accomplished.

That can end up being an endless cycle, and an ineffective one.

Focus means picking among alternatives and giving your energy to only a few things.

The key to focus is leverage.

The principle of leverage stands behind the principle of focus.

Leverage is defined as “making a small investment to gain a high return”.

In this sense it is choosing the two or three things to give your leadership energy to that, when accomplished, will provide the greatest return towards gaining ground on your vision.  It’s knocking over the biggest dominoes that will cause a succession of other dominoes to fall without much effort.

Usually high leveraged, focused leadership endeavors, are future oriented and not urgent.

They are often people related.  This often requires saying “no” to the screaming needs and saying “yes” to those that only whisper to you.

Leading something of significance is never simple.  It is complex by its very nature.  This requires focus, which means thinking carefully about the highest leveraged decisions and efforts you can make.  This is good stewardship.  Lead well!

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